SNNP Health Profile

The population of SNNPR has low access to social services including health care. The potential health service coverage, defined as population living within 10km of a primary heath care unit in EFY 2002, is estimated to be 93%. Actual utilization, however, is estimated not to exceed 50%. The burden of disease in SNNPR, as measured by premature death from all causes, comes primarily from preventable causes and is dominated by communicable diseases, reproductive health problems and nutritional deficiencies.  The leading causes of morbidity and mortality are mostly attributable to lack of clean drinking water, poor sanitation, and low public awareness of nutrition, environmental health and personal hygiene practices.  



The health indicators in the Region are among the lowest in the country.  According to the EDHS 2005, neonatal, infant and under-five mortality are 36, 85 and 142 per 1,000 live births, respectively. The crude birth rate is estimated to be 36 per thousand. Maternal mortality ratio of the region is estimated to be similar to that of the country 673/100,000 live births and Life   expectancy is 48 years.


 According to the single point HIV prevalence estimate of 2007, HIV prevalence in SNNPR is 1.5% (urban 7.2% and rural 0.8%) with a total of 141,545 people living with HIV and AIDS.  In addition to the wide urban-rural variation, the prevalence among women is higher than men, particularly among the 15-24 years age group and the rural community (prevalence in women almost twice that of men).  Available data also indicates that small towns have a higher prevalence than urban areas which has serious implications in terms of spread to rural areas. Among the factors fueling the spread include poverty, gender inequality, lack of access to services, and traditional and cultural influences.

The ratio of population per health institution also shows significant variations. Currently, there are a total of 22 hospitals, 448 health centers and 3340 health posts. There are also 15 pharmacies, 49 drug stores and 449 rural drug vendors. The burden of disease (BOD) in the SNNPR, measured by premature death from all causes, comes from primarily preventable causes and is dominated by communicable diseases. The leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the region are mostly attributable to lack of clean drinking water, poor sanitation, and low public awareness of environmental health and personal hygiene practices.

From the total geographic area of the region, about 60-70% is malarious and health facility reports imply that malaria is one of the major causes of morbidity.   The main reasons for high spread of malaria include; lack of community-based environmental control activities, global warming, resistance of malaria parasites and mosquitoes to drugs and insecticide chemicals. Recently due to scaling up of high impact intervention such as ITNs and IRS the burden of the disease significantly reduced in relation of the previous years.

During 2002 E.C malaria is the first of all top 20 diseases contributing for morbidity and mortality at health center and hospital level. It was making about 27.6 % among 20 outpatient visits.  Among those who were admitted for hospital and health center care, it accounts for 21.8 % of death’s. 


Moreover, HIV and tuberculosis are posing huge burden, particularly the high spread of HIV is increasing tuberculosis cases in the communities. On average about 20000 tuberculosis cases are registered annually as compared five to eight thousands cases 8 years back.   In the year 2002 EFY tuberculosis ranked fourth to a leading cause of morbidity (4.6%) and 3rd to death(6.17%) in hospitals and health centers. An estimated over 38,000 AIDS cases with over 153,666 thousand people living with HIV/AIDS makes the problem worse with highest level of infection in the age group from 15-24years. In addition to the wide urban-rural variation, the prevalence among women (2%) is higher than men (1.4%), particularly among the 15-24 years age group and the rural community (prevalence in women almost twice that of men).  Available data also indicates that small towns have a higher prevalence than urban areas which has serious implications in terms of spread to rural areas. Among the factors fueling the spread include poverty, gender inequality, lack of access to services, and traditional and cultural influences.